Children just aren't going to know what sun is

Enjoy it while it lasts

There’s a great piece by David Rose in the Mail On Sunday nicely summing up what a lot of us here knew already: that the thing we really need to fear right now is not global warming but global cooling. And that, on current evidence, it’s global cooling we’re going to get.
The supposed ‘consensus’ on man-made global warming is facing an inconvenient challenge after the release of new temperature data showing the planet has not warmed for the past 15 years.

The figures suggest that we could even be heading for a mini ice age to rival the 70-year temperature drop that saw frost fairs held on the Thames in the 17th Century.

Based on readings from more than 30,000 measuring stations, the data was issued last week without fanfare by the…

(to read more, click here)

One thought on “Children just aren't going to know what sun is”

  1. The “consensus of experts” approach to defining what “science methodology” is pure academia. In history journals, peer review works because it is constructive: “peer” reviewers are honest and objective as far as possible. In science “peer” review, you always have corruption. This goes back to the so-called “profession” of science, circa 1850, when amateur free thinkers and experimentalists like bookbinder’s apprentice and Davy bottle-washer Michael Faraday (discoverer of electromagnetic induction, the thing that merely generates all electricity, drives all transformers and turns all electric motors) started to be replaced by Oxbridge educated dons. Here is the mathematician Oliver Heaviside describing censorship by dollar-grabbing professionals in 1893 (who left school at 14 to become a Morse code telegrapher, becoming obsessed by electromagnetic theory and correctly developing transmission line theory as well as predicting the ionosphere, the “Heaviside layer”).

    Heaviside, Electromagnetic Theory, vol 1, 1893, p337: “Internal obstruction and superficial construction … If you have got anything new, in substance or in method, and want to propagate it rapidly, you need not expect anything but hindrance from the old practitioner – even though he sat at the feet of Faraday. Beetles could do that. Besides, the old practitioner [any so-called “professional” scientist in general as well] is apt to measure the value of science by the number of dollars he thinks it is likely to bring into his pocket, and if he does not see the dollars, he is very disinclined to disturb his ancient prejudices. But only give him plenty of rope, and when the new views have become fashionably current, he may find it worth his while to adopt them, though, perhaps, in a somewhat sneaky manner [plagiarism], not unmixed with bluster, and make believe he knew about it when he was a little boy! He sees a prospect of dollars in the distance, that is the reason. The perfect obstructor [“peer”-review bias] having failed, try the perfect conductor. … Prof. Tait [the famed quaternionic expert] says he cannot understand my vectors, though he can understand much harder things. But men who have no quaterionic prejudices can understand them, and do.” – http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=juMqHkD7YHMC&pg=PA337&lpg=PA337&ganpub=k186085&ganclk=GOOG_GB_1469676051#v=onepage&q&f=true

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